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Carlo di Borgogna



Carlo di Borgogna

Giovanni Pacini,

3 disc set

CD £37.50

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ORC21
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This remarkable romantic melodrama was all but forgotten after it was cold-shouldered by its original Venetian audience in 1835. This completely new performing edition reveals it as a vocal showcase of... read more

BUY TRACKS
Song title Time Format Price
playstop01 Carlo di Borgogna: Preludio02:27
playstop02 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena I: Coro: Odi - I cannoni annunziano 03:51
playstop03 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena I: Cavatina: Di mie cure, di mia fede 01:38
playstop04 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena II: Senti, senti guerreschi concenti ? 02:18
playstop05 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena II: Cavatini: Vinsi, o popoli - domo e l'orgoglio 05:10
playstop06 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena III: Coro: Ma d'arpe tremanti qual s'ode armonia! 02:04
playstop07 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena III: Cavatina: Del ciel cura, quest'alloro 02:35
playstop08 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena III: Cabaletta: Di gioia sorse il di ? 03:32
playstop09 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena III: Stretta: Se voce di gloria 03:04
playstop10 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena IV: Scena: Vieni, Arnoldo, al mio seno 04:24
playstop11 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena V: Scena: Calmati, Estella ? calma quei trasporti - scena VI: Ah! Sei con me! 03:11
playstop12 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena VI: Terzetto: Nol cercar: Carlo! 03:02
playstop13 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena VII: Andante sostenuto: Ad un'altra quel tuo core! 05:27
playstop14 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena VII: Stretto: Vanne all sposa, o barbaro 03:23
playstop15 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena VIII: Cavatina: Qual astro novello, repente, si bello 02:58
playstop16 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena VIII: Cavatina: Vago ciel del caro sposo 04:54
playstop17 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena VIII: Cabaletta: Qual ti pinge il mio desio 04:49
playstop18 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena VIII: Scena: Lord Athol - Quest'indugio! ? - scena IX: Ecco Carlo! 03:25
playstop19 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena IX: Scena: Carlo - Carlo - - scena X: Misera! Redi 02:05
playstop20 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena X: Terzetto: Mira un Dio, che da quel tempio 05:10
playstop21 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena X: Scena: Donna, or tu ? ch'e mio - scena XI: Ola! Che fai? 03:10
playstop22 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena XI: Quatetto: Si, tutto omai fini 04:43
playstop23 Carlo di Borgogna: Part I: scena XI: Stretta del finale: Ah! Sgombrate, omai lasciatemi 03:09
playstop24 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena I: Coro: Alla festa, compagne 06:24
playstop25 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena I: Coro: Ma qual suono! - scena II: Vendetta 02:43
playstop26 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena III: Aria: Si, vendetta! 01:45
playstop27 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena III: Aria: D'essa in traccia oh! Quanto errai 02:29
playstop28 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena III: Aria: Ripetiamo il sacro guiro 02:23
playstop29 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena IV: Duetto: In quella selva ascosa - scena V: Dolci pensieri 04:44
playstop30 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena V: Duetto: Carlo di guerra e il fulmine 03:22
playstop31 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena V: Moderato: Ma il ciel dall'ombre un vindice 02:56
playstop32 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena V: Cabaletta: Io di Carlo muovo al campo 02:44
playstop33 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena VI: Duetto: Freme ancor la procella! 05:31
playstop34 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena VII: Duetto: Noi riparammo: ed I compagni spersi - scena VIII: Ah! Che oggretto! 04:10
playstop35 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena VIII: Duetto: L'ombra mira di colei 03:25
playstop36 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena VIII: Andantino: Carlo quel talamo 04:05
playstop37 Carlo di Borgogna: Part II: scena VIII: Stretta: Perdon chiedi? 03:33
playstop38 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena I: Duetto: Cada Borgogna! - scena II: Quai grida! 03:25
playstop39 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena III: Suetto: Ciel! Tu! 03:15
playstop40 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena III: Andantino: Qual d'un angelo nel core 05:04
playstop41 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena III: Stretta: Estella tradita 03:13
playstop42 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena IV: Coro: Squillan gia di vetta in vetta 10:02
playstop43 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena V: Aria: Alfin noi lo premiamo ? 03:04
playstop44 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena V: Aria: Del Leone Di Borgogna - scena VI: Carlo! Arresta! 04:15
playstop45 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena VI: Romanza: Era un Dio, che l'ispirava! 02:44
playstop46 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena VI: Cabaletta: Un vano prestigio 03:40
playstop47 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena VII: Aria: S'inoltra il Temerario: ecco il gran giorno 02:07
playstop48 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena VII: Aria: Or io prego. Deh! Lasciate 01:29
playstop49 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena VII: Preghiera: La su d'esso nel cimento 05:08
playstop50 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena VII: Cabaletta: La cara spoglia esanime 03:49
playstop51 Carlo di Borgogna: Part III: scena VIII: Finale Ultimo: Vi salvate: il tradimento 01:29

This remarkable romantic melodrama was all but forgotten after it was cold-shouldered by its original Venetian audience in 1835. This completely new performing edition reveals it as a vocal showcase of huge variety. Bruce Ford takes the title role, giving a bravura performance as the Burgundian duke caught in tragic conflict between love and duty. Jennifer Larmore and Elizabeth Futral are the rival leading ladies, whose final confrontation is a duet of exceptional virtuosity.

Booklet includes complete libretto with English translation.

'Any lover of Italian opera will find this recording an absolutely essential purchase' - American Record Guide

Bruce Ford (Carlo), Elizabeth Futral (Leonora di Jork), Roberto Frontali (Arnoldo), Jennifer Larmore (Estella), Helen Williams (Amelia), Lord Athol (Dominic Natoli), Garry Magee (Guglielmo d’Erlach), Academy of St Martin in the Fields, David Parry – conductor

 PART ONE

Scene 1.  The people of Dijon have gathered to greet Carlo il Temerario upon his return from Liége, where he has succeeded in reducing the rebellious citizens to order.  Arnoldo d'Ivry, his tutor and mentor, looks upon this latest exploit as his reward for so many years of faithful service; while his daughter Estella, who is one of a number of young women who come to strew flowers at Carlo's feet and crown his head with laurel, cannot conceal that she is in love.  Carlo, just as clearly, reciprocates her feelings.

 

The mood of joyous celebration is broken when Lord Athol, the English ambassador, presents Carlo with a letter announcing the approach of the princess he is pledged to marry: Leonora, the sister of Edward IV of England.  Athol's suspicions that Carlo does not welcome the match seem to be confirmed as he watches the less-than-happy manner in which the letter is received and read.

 

Scene 2.  Arnoldo's apartments in the ducal palace.  Amelia, one of Estella's relatives, flatters her by suggesting that she is about to become Duchess of Burgundy, but when Carlo appears, it is only to break the news that he is bound by a sacred oath to his dying father to marry Leonora.  Arnoldo, who enters in the confident expectation that he is about to bless his daughter's betrothal, instead finds his hopes dashed.  In an outburst of anger he denounces Carlo as a seducer, and he and Estella leave, threatening that a day of retribution will swiftly follow.

 

Scene 3.  The people of Dijon have gathered once more, this time to greet the arrival of Leonora.  A chapel in the background is decked with decorations, and lit up for the immediate celebration of the marriage.  Leonora makes her entry, and courteously acknowledges Burgundy as her future home.  She is disturbed, however, when Carlo is slow to appear, and then greets her in a less than warmly affectionate manner.   Forcing himself to play his unwelcome part, he offers her his hand, and they are about to proceed to the chapel when there is an interruption.  Estella enters, wild of appearance and all but demented of manner, defying Leonora and claiming Carlo as her own.  Lord Athol tries to have her arrested, but this only arouses Carlo's wrath since he sees it as a usurpation of his own authority.

 

At this moment of crisis Arnoldo also appears.  He springs to Estella's defence and draws his sword against Athol.  They fight and - off-stage - Arnoldo falls.  The curtain descends on a scene of confusion and consternation as Estella flees in wild despair and grief, Leonora threatens revenge on the part of England, and Carlo stands motionless in the midst of all, a prey to the blackest concentration.

 

PART TWO

Scene 1.  The rustic inhabitants of a smiling Swiss valley appear to celebrate the anniversary of the arrival of an 'Angel' - an unknown woman who has showered blessings upon them - to dwell in an ancient castle which is visible in the background.  They dance and sing, but are soon interrupted by the sound of horns.  Guglielmo, a mountaineer, descends from the heights with his followers, inciting all to arms to defend Switzerland against the invading Burgundians.

 

An unknown warrior in black armour also appears, and Guglielmo is overjoyed to recognise Arnoldo - not dead, as all had believed, but nursed back to health and now in search of his daughter.  Provided they will agree to his retaining his anonimity, he agrees to join their cause, and all unite in swearing to fight to the death for their country.

 

They depart, and the stage remains empty for a moment before Lord Athol comes out of the surrounding woods, followed by Leonora, dressed as a warrior, with a small escort of knights and squires.  They are in search of Carlo's forces, but have lost their way, and are now threatened by an approaching storm.  Athol goes to reconnoitre, and in his absence Leonora finds herself accosted by Arnoldo.  They soon realise that they owe allegiance to opposite sides, Arnoldo denouncing Carlo as a betrayer of honour and innocence, and Leonora declaring him the invincible thunderbolt of war.  In obedience to ancient Swiss laws of hospitality, Arnoldo allows her to depart unmolested with her companions.

 

Scene 2.  A room in the castle which had been distantly visible in the previous scene.  The 'Angel' of the district - who is, of course, Estella - broods as she listens to the storm raging outside. 

 

Amelia announces that two strangers, waylaid by the tempest, seek shelter.  They turn out to be Carlo and one of his knights, Oberto.  While Oberto retires to seek rest, Carlo allows his thoughts to stray, as they always inevitably do, to Estella. 

 

A secret door opens, and Estella appears, heavily veiled in black.  Carlo recognises her from her voice, and protests that he loves her just as much as ever.  She, however, is set upon confronting him with the enormity of his crime.  She touches a spring, and a tapestry at the back of the stage disappears to reveal a sepulchral chamber.  In the centre there is an elevated tomb, bearing the inscription 'Arnoldo d'Ivry', while a low open tomb below it is inscribed 'For Estella d'Ivry'.  Suitably appalled, Carlo presents his sword and invites Estella to slay him.  Her answer is to retort that, though his death is imminent, it is not for her to spill his blood: it is sacred to the shades of those he has slaughtered.  At this moment Carlo hears the horns of his followers.  His courage returns, and he goes to rejoin them, while Estella retires through the secret door.

 

PART THREE

Scene 1.  A wood, with the ruins of an ancient priory, a chapel reconstructed in its midst.  A skirmish is taking place nearby, and a fugitive Leonora, still in masculine attire, is pursued and disarmed by Guglielmo and his followers.  Her continued defiance results in cries for her death, but the door of the chapel opens and Estella appears, once again heavily veiled.  At the sight of their 'Angel', the mountaineers lower their arms in respect and deliver Leonora to her mercy.  Estella is already aware of Leonora's identity, and when she raises her veil, she too is recognised.  Each woman reproaches the other with destroying her happiness, but at the moment when Leonora expects to be handed over to the mountaineers and put to death, Estella instead orders her to be conducted in safety to Carlo's camp. 

 

Scene 2.  High craggy Swiss mountains, separated by gorges leading to the Lake of Morat.  The Swiss mountaineers are preparing to ambush Carlo and his army, and are balancing rocks upon the brink of the cliffs.  A distant march announces the approach of the Burgundians, and Carlo, deceived by the failure of the Swiss so far to oppose him, urges his forces forward into the gorges.  A female figure - Estella - appears upon the heights above.  Aware of Carlo's danger, she makes a last attempt to save him, urging him to retreat.  Although all are momentarily struck dumb with terror, Carlo's rallying cry restores their spirits, and they enter the gorges. 

 

Leonora now appears with her escort, still trying to rejoin Carlo.  Within moments she is surrounded by Guglielmo and his mountaineers, who force her to watch as Arnoldo and his companions hurl rocks down from above upon the hapless Burgundians.  Carlo appears upon a bridge spanning the gorges, but finds himself confronted by Arnoldo.  Estella, who witnesses their encounter from afar, cries out in an attempt to save the life of her lover, but Arnoldo strikes him down and he falls to his death.  A bloodied Arnoldo recognises Estella, but their reunion is only momentary, for she collapses and dies in his arms.

 

The opera ends as the Swiss celebrate their victory.

 


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