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Emma d'Antiochia



Emma d'Antiochia

Saverio Mercadante

3 disc set

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Emma d’Anitochia is one of a number of important operas, which Mercadante wrote in the years 1831-1837 – a period that began on his return from several years spent in Spain and Portugal. It... read more

BUY TRACKS
Song title Time Format Price
playstop01 Emma d'Antiochia: Sinfonia07:20
playstop02 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena I: Coro: Della Sidonia porpora 05:27
playstop03 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena II: Duetto: I tuoi sospetti, Adelia 04:02
playstop04 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena II: Coro: Quai lieti suoni? - scena III: Guinto e Corrado in porto ? 01:56
playstop05 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena III: Stretta: Vieni e per noi cominciano 02:44
playstop06 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena IV: Recitative: Son ne' miei Lari! ? 02:31
playstop07 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena IV: Cavatina: Il mio cuore, il cor paterno 03:06
playstop08 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena IV: Cabaletta: Se una madre io diedi a voi 03:44
playstop09 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena IV: Scena: Or che di tanto evento - scena V: La Sovrana! 01:14
playstop10 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena V: Recitative: Giovin leggiadra 01:29
playstop11 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena V: Aria: Ah! Se commossa io sono 03:30
playstop12 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena V: Cabaletta: Nobil signor perdonami 05:36
playstop13 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena VI: Scena: Nel mio cuore lacerato 00:53
playstop14 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena VI: Aria: Io soffrir: mortale in terra 03:45
playstop15 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena VI: Cabaletta: Partiro: dell'empia sorte 03:50
playstop16 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena VII: Scena: Sola son'io - pianger non vista io posso - scena VIII: Che vuoi tu? - scena IX: Emma! 08:17
playstop17 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena IX: Duetto: Amai quell'alma ingenua 04:25
playstop18 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena IX: Andante: Emma! Ruggiero! 02:53
playstop19 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena IX: Scena: Ciel! Qual suon? - scena X: Di trovarvi insieme uniti 03:06
playstop20 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena IX: Quartetto: Ei qui dianzi ? 03:33
playstop21 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena X: Coro: Al tempio! 01:04
playstop22 Emma d'Antiochia: Act I scena X: Stretta: Ah! Nel tuo volto splendere 03:07
playstop23 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena I: Introduzione - Banda sul palco 01:14
playstop24 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena I: Recitative: Oh! Qual disegno in mente - scena II: Addio! - Le faci svengono 01:14
playstop25 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena II: Coro: Addio! - Le stelle ascondono 03:59
playstop26 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena III: Scena: Sei tu? - scena IV: Sollecito mi reca armi e destriero 07:01
playstop27 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena IV: Scena: Salva e ancora 03:29
playstop28 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena IV: Duetto: Fuggi meco, fuggi meco 02:09
playstop29 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena V: Trio: Cielo! Sei tu che il vindice 03:39
playstop30 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena V: Scena: Ov'e Corrado? ? - scena VI: Vola: Smarrita Adelia 02:18
playstop31 Emma d'Antiochia: Act II scena VI: Stretto: La vittima vostra, iniqui, mirate ? 04:21
playstop32 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena I: Introduzione: Ella a ciascuno involasi ? 03:03
playstop33 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena II: Recitative: A me Reuggiero - scena III: Eccomi a te, Corrado 04:42
playstop34 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena III: Aria: Non sai tu che il mondo intero 03:55
playstop35 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena III: Cabaletta: Ah! Non fia che maledetto 04:10
playstop36 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena IV: Scena: Viver promisi ? 00:59
playstop37 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena IV: Duetto: Emma! Tu qui? 04:19
playstop38 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena IV: Andante: Il cor, il cor che svegliasi 02:59
playstop39 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena IV: Scena: Or va: comincia a sorgere 02:05
playstop40 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena IV: Cabaletta: Se mai piangente e supplice 03:56
playstop41 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena V: Recitativo: Al piu difficil punto, al piu tremendo 02:39
playstop42 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena VI: Scena: Emma ? t'affretta 03:42
playstop43 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena VI: Aria: In quest'ora fatale e temuta 04:03
playstop44 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena VI: Cabaletta: Parta, parta 03:39
playstop45 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena VI: Duetto: Mi lasciate 04:24
playstop46 Emma d'Antiochia: Act III scena VI: Lento: Ah! Perdona a duol estremo 07:43

Emma d’Anitochia is one of a number of important operas, which Mercadante wrote in the years 1831-1837 – a period that began on his return from several years spent in Spain and Portugal. It was premiered at the Teatro La Fenice, Venice on the 8th March 1834 and tells the story of Emma (Nelly Miricioiu) on the rebound from an unhappy marriage, marries Count Corrado (Robert Serville), only to discover that his favorite nephew, Ruggiero (Bruce Ford) is her ex-lover. Ruggiero is to marry Corados daughter, Adelia (Maria Constanza Nocentini), but confesses to Emma that he still loves her. They agree to run away together but are intercepted by Corrado. Ruggiero is banished forever and Emma finding life impossible, takes poison and dies. The libretto of the opera written by Felice Romani, the librettist of Bellini’s Norma, is centered more on present passion and anguish rather than detailing reasons and motives. Romani’s libretto is right at the centre of the raison d’etre of Italian romantic opera: the depiction of human beings swept away by overwhelming passions. It is a libretto, which lent itself admirably to the concern of all Italian composers to express heightened emotion through memorable melody.

Booklet includes complete libretto with English translation.

'Conductor David Parry seems to have an almost uncanny insight into music of the bel canto school. His is rhythmically propulsive, always supportive of the singers, but not subject to their whims' - Charles H Parsons, American Record Guide

Nelly Miricioiu (Emma), Roberto Servile (Corrado di Monferrato), Bruce Ford (Ruggiero), Maria Costanza Nocentini (Adelia), Colin Lee (Aladino), Rebecca von Lipinski (Odetta), London Philharmonic Orchestra, David Parry – conductor

Act I

Scene 1.   We are in Syria, in the city of Tyre, in the twelfth century.  Adelia, the daughter of Corrado di Monferrato, the Count of Tyre, ostensibly has double reason to rejoice: she is soon to marry her cousin, Ruggiero, and this very day her father is expected home from a campaign against the Saracens.  She is, however, despondent and apprehensive, for she knows that Ruggiero once loved – and lost – another woman, and she suspects that he still pines for this former love.  Ruggiero overhears her voicing her fears, and seeks to reassure her that his heart is now hers alone.

The arrival of the expected vessel in the port is greeted with general rejoicing, and Corrado disembarks.  He announces that, to seal an alliance between Tyre and Antioch, he has entered into a second marriage.  But when his bride, Emma, appears, both she and Ruggiero are taken aback to recognise each other.  For Emma is none other than Ruggiero’s former love.   Their struggle to control themselves is apparent to all, but Emma defuses the situation by saying that Ruggiero bears a striking resemblance to her dead brother.  She forces herself to express joy at the prospect of his marriage to Adelia. 

Left alone with Aladino, Emma’s faithful slave, Ruggiero begs him to help him see Emma one last time.  He will then, he declares, flee from Tyre and seek his death in distant lands.

Scene 2.  A tearful and unhappy Emma receives Ruggiero’s visit.  Each confesses to five years’ misery since they were torn apart, and Ruggiero declares that, though he had thought he could love Adelia, it has needed only Emma’s return to show him the full extent of his error.  Though each is alive to the impossibility of the present situation, they find the idea of never seeing each other again unbearable…

They are interrupted by the arrival of Corrado and Adelia.  At Adelia’s urging, Corrado has agreed to bring the marriage forward.  Ruggiero’s evident dismay reawakens all her fears and suspicions, but Emma seeks to pass off his reaction as an excess of joy at the approach of such long-awaited bliss.  Knights and ladies enter to escort the bride and groom to church, and Ruggiero finds himself dragged, bewildered, to the altar.

Act Two.

The wedding is over, and knights and ladies, having danced the evening away, take leave of the married couple outside the nuptial chamber. 

In the darkness that descends upon the palace, an agitated and dismayed Emma appears.  Up till this point, she has managed to play her role of wife and mother, but now her moral forces are exhausted. 

As Aladino tries to lead her back to her chambers, Ruggiero appears, ordering a squire to bring his arms and a horse to the gates.  Rather than consummate the marriage, he has determined to leave Tyre.  At the sight of Emma’s growing desperation he urges her to flee with him, but they find their way barred by an outraged Corrado.  As if this is not crisis enough, the air is rent with cries of horror, and a pale, dishevelled Adelia appears.  Realising that she is deserted, she swoons in her father’s arms, and the act ends as all the characters give vent to either recrimination or self-reproach.

Act Three.

Desolation reigns.  Emma has been shut – or has shut herself – in her apartments; Ruggiero has been cast into prison.  Corrado, however, has him brought before him, and tells him that, rather than exact a bloody revenge, he has decided to place him on board a Venetian vessel and send him into exile.  Ruggiero is sufficiently guilt-stricken and remorseful to see the wisdom of this decision, and agrees to go.      

Emma manages to see him one last time, and they bid each other farewell.  Then, with no prospect of finding a peaceful haven either upon earth or in heaven, Emma, in resigned despair, appeals to Aladino to help her end her life.  He has at his disposal poison and a dagger.  He gives her the poison, but, unwilling to live without her, reserves the dagger for himself.

Emma prays that, at the end of her ordeal, she may at least come before an understanding God, and then, as she hears the sounds of Ruggiero’s vessel departing, drinks the poison.  But her suffering is not over yet.  Adelia appears, denouncing her as the cause of all her woes.  It is not until Emma actually begins to falter and collapse that the two women, the one dying and the other appalled, are finally reconciled.  Emma totters away to die upon the body of Aladino, while Corrado and Adelia are left, forgiving rather than condemning, to offer each other what consolation they can.


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