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Ginevra di Scozia

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Ginevra di Scozia

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Giovanni Simone Mayr is remembered today as the teacher of Donizetti. Born in Bavaria, he came to Italy at the end of the 18th century and became one of the most respected composers in the country. His... read more

BUY TRACKS
Song title Time Format Price
playstop01 Ginevra di Scozia: Sinfonia05:33
playstop02 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena I: Introduzione: Deh! Proteggi, o Ciel clemente 04:53
playstop03 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena I: Recitative: Ah! I'impazienza mia 01:39
playstop04 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena I: Coro e Scena: S'apra alla gioja - scena II: Ah, padre! 01:07
playstop05 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena II: Cavatina: Quest'anima consola 03:54
playstop06 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena II: Recitative: Figlia, tutto intendesti - scena III: Amica, io vedro dunque 02:43
playstop07 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena IV: Scena: Quale m'affanna e opprime 01:51
playstop08 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena IV: Cavatina: Se pietoso, Amor, tu sei 03:53
playstop09 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena IV: Recitative: Dalinda! ? Mio Signor! ? - scena V: Che pensa ei mai? 02:31
playstop10 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VI: March00:52
playstop11 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VI: Recitative: Figlia, gioisci: il vincitor fra poco 00:36
playstop12 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VI: Scena: Egli gia vien: da lunge 00:51
playstop13 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VII: Cavatina: Ecco l'Eroe, ecco il guerriero 02:49
playstop14 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VII: Larghetto cantabile: Ma piu del trionfo 02:43
playstop15 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VII: Recitative: Sire, vincemmo, Mai piu bella e intera 02:18
playstop16 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VIII: March01:06
playstop17 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VIII: Recitative: Dunque sempre spietata 01:26
playstop18 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena VIII: Aria: Ah! Dov'e quell'alma audace 02:53
playstop19 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena IX: Recitative: Non piu: Lasciami, o Duca, troppo omai 01:45
playstop20 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena IX: Recitative: Oh Dio! Qual gel mi scende al cor! ? 01:05
playstop21 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena IX: Duet: Vieni: col t'attendo 01:45
playstop22 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena IX: Larghetto cantabile: Quanti mai contrarj affetti 01:23
playstop23 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena IX: Tempo primo: Ma verrai? 03:39
playstop24 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena X: Recitative: Cielo! Come agitato 00:44
playstop25 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena X: Aria: Tremo confuso, agitato, e peno 03:00
playstop26 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XI: Scena: Gia l'ombre sue notte distese. - scena XII: Ecco il momento, sacro 06:34
playstop27 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XIII: Allegro: Che vidi! Oh Dio! ? 02:38
playstop28 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XIII: Aria: Ah! Per chi vivere degg'io 03:23
playstop29 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XIV: Scena e Coro: Ah misero fratello! ? - scena XV: Ola! Fermate: e quali 02:14
playstop30 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XV: Aria: Audaci! Io sol m'oppongo 05:05
playstop31 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XVI: Finale Primo: Sgombra, o Ciel! Dal mio seno - scena XVII: Che avvenne? ? 05:21
playstop32 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XVI: Aria: Di mia morte s'hai desio 01:32
playstop33 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XVI: Andantino larghetto: Tu che vedi, o Ciel clemente 02:54
playstop34 Ginevra di Scozia: Act I scena XVI: Tempo primo: Ma voi tutti, ohime! 04:36
playstop35 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena I: Recitative: Oh me dolente! Ahi! Lasso! - scena II: Pieta ? la vita ? 01:51
playstop36 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena II: Aria: Tu vedi in me la vittima 03:01
playstop37 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena III: Scena dei Solitari: Ove son io? ? 05:11
playstop38 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena III: Aria: Ah! Che per me non v'e 02:44
playstop39 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IV: Coro di Solitari: Quale orror! Che infausto di! 01:15
playstop40 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IV: Recitative: Qual sciagura mai! 01:27
playstop41 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IV: Allegro: Non perira! 02:05
playstop42 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IV: Rondo: Se sapeste chi m'accende 01:46
playstop43 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IV: Andantino grazioso: Mentre fra l'armi 01:58
playstop44 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IV: Scena: Ma ? s'e rea! 03:11
playstop45 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena V: Recitative: Qual'orrida sciagura 01:30
playstop46 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena V: Recitative: La legge eseguiro. 00:30
playstop47 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena VI: Aria: Tu mi traffigi, ingrato! 03:18
playstop48 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena VI: Recitative: Alta pieta mi desti 00:48
playstop49 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena VII: Scena: Infelice Ginevra! ? 06:49
playstop50 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena VII: Rondo: A goder la bella pace 03:48
playstop51 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena VII: Allegro: Ah! Sarai paga, avversa sorte! - scena VIII: Crudo cimento! 03:35
playstop52 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IX: Coro e Scena: Il sole all'occaso 04:25
playstop53 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IX: Aria: Come frenare il pianto 01:49
playstop54 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena IX: Allegro: Dunque nel campo scendi? 03:58
playstop55 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena X: Recitative: Figlia! Padre! 01:50
playstop56 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XI: Quintetto: Io la difendo. 01:02
playstop57 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XI: Recitative: Guerrier, chi sei? 01:44
playstop58 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XII: Recitative: Orrible momento! 02:12
playstop59 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XII: Recitative: Che dici tu? ? 01:44
playstop60 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XII: Duet: Per pieta, deh! 02:24
playstop61 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XII: Larghetto: Che palpiti atroci 01:02
playstop62 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XII: Tempo primo: Ah! Si vada ? 01:46
playstop63 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XIII: Coro: Oh giorno di spavento! 03:58
playstop64 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XIII: Recitative: Popoli! Al gran cimento ecco la figlia - scena XIV: Fermatevi, Guerrieri. 03:53
playstop65 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XIV: Finale: Apri, mia vita, I lumi 01:23
playstop66 Ginevra di Scozia: Act II scena XIV: Scozzese: Oh! Giocondo, e lieto giorno! 04:33

Giovanni Simone Mayr is remembered today as the teacher of Donizetti. Born in Bavaria, he came to Italy at the end of the 18th century and became one of the most respected composers in the country. His operas were performed at the best theatres and with the best casts. What is it about Mayr that is so interesting? First of all, he is said to be the missing link in opera – that composer who completes the connection from Mozart to Rossini. The Teatro Nuovo in Trieste opened on April 21, 1801, with the first performance of Mayr’s opera.

The bicentenary of this occasion was celebrated with a new production of the same work and Opera Rara went to Trieste to record the initial performances of this important revival. The cast is led by French soprano Elizabeth Vidal who tackles the stratospheric role of Ginevra with ease (and Es - a bushel of them!!). As the hero Ariodante, Daniela Barcellona confirms her place on the roster of talented, young artists emerging from Italy. Antonino Siragusa, likewise, is representative of the new generation of bel canto tenors.

Booklet includes complete libretto with English translation.

'Elizabeth Vidal is spectacular, Daniela Barcellona's tone gloriously rich and firm' - Penguin CD and DVD Guide

Luca Grassi (Il Re di Scozia), Elizabeth Vidal (Ginevra), Daniela Barcellona (Ariodante), Antonino Siragusa (Polinesso), Giuseppina Piunti (Dalinda), Marco Lazzara (Lurcanio), Aldo Orsolini (Vafrino), Damiano Locatelli (Il Grand Solitario), Orchestra & Chorus of the Teatro Lirico ‘Giuseppe Verdi’ Trieste, Tiziano Severini – conductor

The opera is set in St Andrews in Scotland in legendary times.

 

ACT ONE.

Scene 1.  The King of Scotland and his courtiers pray to Heaven for aid, since at this very moment, outside the walls of the city, their army is engaged in battle with invaders from Ireland.  To their relief an Italian knight, Lurcanio, brings news that his brother Ariodante, who has been away raising extra forces in England, has returned just in time. Arrived on the field of battle, he has succeeded in turning the tide in Scotland's favour.  Apprehension gives way to celebration as all speed Lurcanio on his way to share in Ariodante's victory.

The King shares the good news with his daughter, Ginevra, and bids her prepare a garland for the victor's brow - an order that she willingly receives, since she is deeply in love with Ariodante.  Dalinda, her waiting-woman, tries to caution her, suggesting that her father will never allow her to marry a foreign knight with no connections.  Dalinda recommends, instead, that she should accept the suit of Polinesso, Duke of Albany, the High Constable of Scotland, but Ginevra declares that she dislikes Polinesso just as much as she loves Ariodante.  Such a reaction can scarcely be unwelcome to Dalinda, for she herself is in love with Polinesso, and has made her suggestions only at his bidding.

 

Scene 2.  Dalinda, meeting with Polinesso in the palace gardens, delivers her report.  Polinesso, who is motivated by pride, by insatiable desire for Ginevra and by hatred for Ariodante, receives the news of his rejection with inner rage but outward calm.  He pretends to wish to renew his previous liaison with Dalinda, and tells her that he will keep tryst with her that evening.  She must let a rope ladder down from Ginevra's balcony so that he may ascend to her embraces.  More surprisingly, he tells her that she must wear clothes similar to Ginevra's, and arrange her hair in Ginevra's manner.  Though mystified at such a 'mad whim', Dalinda agrees.

 

Scene 3.  The King and his courtiers gather to celebrate Ariodante's victory.  Ariodante enters in triumph, kneels before the King and lays the spoils of battle at his feet.  Ginevra crowns him with laurel.  Polinesso, watching, is consumed by jealousy.

      Lurcanio reproaches Dalinda with failing to return his love, but she replies that her affections were already committed before ever he arrived in Scotland.  She refuses to reveal the name of his successful rival.

 

Scene 4.  Polinesso waylays Ariodante in the palace gardens, and taunts him with suggestions that Ginevra is playing him false.  He eventually claims that he himself is Ginevra's lover, and suggests that, if Ariodante wishes to gain proof of the fact, he should watch beneath her balcony that evening.  Incredulous and indignant, Ariodante can only agree to do so, adding that if what Polinesso insinuates is true, Ginevra will be his.

 

Scene 5.  A partly ruined area of the city overlooked by Ginevra's apartments, with a bridge over a river in the background.  Ariodante, keeping his appointment, is joined by his brother Lurcanio; they conceal themselves in ruined vaults as Polinesso arrives, aware of Ariodante's presence and gloating to think of his approaching discomfiture.  Dalinda duly appears, and lowers the ladder by which Polinesso ascends.  Ariodante and Lurcanio are both convinced that they have seen Ginevra receiving her lover.  Ariodante tries to stab himself, but is disarmed by Lurcanio.  Thwarted, he races on to the bridge in the background and throws himself into the river.

Lurcanio's distraught cries soon bring people running - and eventually a hypocritical Polinesso, who pretends to interpret the gathering as a riot threatening the life of the King.  When the circumstances of Ariodante's suicide are explained to him, he offers to lead the crowd to the King, with the intention that whoever has been guilty of betraying Ariodante, and thus bringing about his death, may be brought to justice.

 

Scene 6.  Polinesso and Lurcanio lead the populace into the King's presence, and Lurcanio duly denounces Ginevra and demands her death.  The King, appalled to find his own daughter the subject of such an accusation, is faced with having to enforce an ancient law whereby a woman who is proved unchaste is condemned to death by burning at the stake.

 

ACT TWO

Scene 1.  Vafrino, Ariodante's squire, wanders disconsolate upon the shore, unable to find his master's body.  He hears the cries of a woman in distress, and succeeds in rescuing Dalinda from the threats of two would-be assassins.  She tells him that she is the victim of the cruellest deception, and promises to tell him all.

 

Scene 2.  A dense wood surrounding the temple or church of a band of hermits.  Ariodante, who has escaped death, makes his appearance in a state of black despondency.  His thoughts are interrupted by the appearance of the hermits, who inform him that Ginevra has been condemned to death, and will die that very day unless a champion appear to defend her.  Although convinced of her guilt, Ariodante still loves her so deeply that he determines to go to her defence.  The hermits applaud his purpose, and urge him to make haste.

 

Scene 3.  A disconsolate King laments the approaching loss of his daughter, and reproaches Lurcanio for the manner in which he repays his kindnesses to him.  Lurcanio replies that his primary duty is to avenge his brother.

 

Scene 4.  Ginevra assures her father that she is not afraid to die, for death will reunite her with her beloved Ariodante.  She does, however, deplore and fear the infamy that will attach to her name if she is publicly burned at the stake, and begs to be given a sword or a draught of poison so that she can die a more private and becoming death.  The King is deeply disturbed, but does not commit himself either way.

 

Scene 5.  As the sun sinks, Polinesso appears, secretly rejoicing at the part he is about to play as master of ceremonies at Ginevra's burning, but pretending to commiserate with the King in his grief.  When asked if he will defend Ginevra, he predictably declines, declaring his conviction that the law must take its course.

Lurcanio urges that Ginevra's punishment proceed, but at this moment a knight in black armour appears, his vizor lowered.  Declaring that he comes as Ginevra's champion, he throws down his gauntlet, and Lurcanio, as Ginevra's accuser, gathers it up.  Despite Ginevra's pleas to know his identity, the unknown knight declares that he will reveal himself only after the combat.  In accordance with custom, he is left alone with Ginevra until the moment of combat.

Ginevra expresses her gratitude to him, but sues to be released from any obligation to be his, should he prove the victor, since she assures him that she can never love anyone except the Ariodante she has lost.  He, for his part, declares his readiness to die for her, but admits that he has no hope of victory, since 'only he who defends the right shall conquer'.  Ginevra assures him that he does defend the right, and insists that she is innocent.  Impressed by her steadfastness and moved by her pleas, the knight is about to reveal himself when the sound of trumpets calls him to the combat.  He departs in haste.

 

Scene 6.  The great square of the city, with a palisaded area for the combat and, to one side, a funeral pyre.  Ginevra arms her knight, and he and Lurcanio enter the combat area.  But before they can come to blows, Vafrino and Dalinda enter, and the latter confesses how she allowed herself to be seduced, and how, in return, Polinesso delivered her up to two of his servants to be slain.  Polinesso denies her tale, and vaunts his readiness to defend his good name against all comers.  The unknown knight responds - he and Polinesso fight - and Polinesso is disarmed.  Faced with the choice of confession or death, he makes a full and remorseful acknowledgment of his guilt.

Ginevra, her innocence now manifest to all, embraces her father.  She asks permission to end her days in some solitary retreat where she can mourn her Ariodante, but at this point the unknown knight raises his vizor and, to the surprise and joy of all, reveals himself as Ariodante.  He and Ginevra are united, and the opera ends in rejoicing and celebration.

 


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