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Imelda de' Lambertazzi



Imelda de' Lambertazzi

Gaetano Donizetti

2 disc set

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Imelda de’ Lambertazzi immediately precedes Donizetti’s first masterpiece, Anna Bolena, and was written for the Teatro San Carlo in Naples in the same year (1830). However, its fate was very... read more

BUY TRACKS
Song title Time Format Price
playstop01 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena I: All'armi! Oh ferel tromba! 06:10
playstop02 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena II: Amici! e qual risuona 03:22
playstop03 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena II: Voi, che, fulmini di guerra 02:18
playstop04 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena II: Ah! si soda lo squillo di bellice tromba! 03:16
playstop05 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena II: Itale schiere, a sostenerlo accinte 02:02
playstop06 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena III: Vincesti alfin! la tua ferocia e paga! 03:27
playstop07 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena III: Amarti, e nel martoro 02:12
playstop08 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena III: Ma il Ciel non ode I miei lamenti ? 04:32
playstop09 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena IV: E' il genitor nelle sue stanze, Imelda? 01:59
playstop10 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena IV: Ah! m'odi ? 02:08
playstop11 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena IV: Spiro la tregua ? il sai! ? 01:59
playstop12 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena IV: Non ti giurasti mia? 04:52
playstop13 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena V: E' Oralando che si avanza! - scena VI: Padre, e fia ver quanto la fama sparge? 04:17
playstop14 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena VII: Del cittadino al dritto 03:18
playstop15 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena VII: D'invitti Eroi degni nepoti! ai sensi - scena VIII: Il Guefo! 01:49
playstop16 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena VIII: Vengo a voi, non d'armi cinto 02:42
playstop17 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena VIII: L'incarco esponi 01:45
playstop18 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena VIII: E quale pegno di stabil pace 02:49
playstop19 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act I scena IX: Last scena: Imelda! 06:55
playstop20 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena I: Segui i miei passi 06:55
playstop21 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena I: Di Bonifacio il padre ? 05:01
playstop22 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena I: Tu l'hai spenta nel mio petto 03:22
playstop23 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena II: Mi narri il ver? 03:55
playstop24 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena III: Chi viene? 03:54
playstop25 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena III: Dolente a voi ritorno. E spenta, o amici 01:25
playstop26 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena III: Imelda a me volgea 03:35
playstop27 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena III: Si! nel cimento 02:44
playstop28 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena III: Imelda! m'attendi! Seguirimi dovrai ? 03:46
playstop29 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena IV: Asconda il denso vel di notte orrenda 05:25
playstop30 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena IV: Imelda ? Lasciarti? 03:01
playstop31 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena IV: Ma volano rapidi, oh cara! i momenti ? 02:34
playstop32 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena IV: Addio per sempre! 02:23
playstop33 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena V: Ove ten fuggi? Ove ti celi, indega? 01:43
playstop34 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena V: Last scena: Morte al Guelfo! 01:48
playstop35 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: Act II scena V: Padre ? son rea ? lo vedo! 04:29
playstop36 Imelda de' Lambertazzi: M'odi almen, te ne scongiuro 07:54

Imelda de’ Lambertazzi immediately precedes Donizetti’s first masterpiece, Anna Bolena, and was written for the Teatro San Carlo in Naples in the same year (1830). However, its fate was very different and scholars now take the view that the composer’s very concision in his setting of the Romeo and Juliet–like plot, in which Imelda loves Bonifacio, the son of the faction hated by her father Orlando and brother Lamberto, wrong-footed the Neapolitan public. The casting politics of Naples also played a role in the Imelda San Carlo reception and, after a brief stage history; the work unfortunately disappeared for well over a century. Now, with Opera Rara’s world premiere studio recording of this innovative work, a wider audience can experience one of Donizetti’s most thrilling and dynamic scores. The wonderful young soprano, Nicole Cabell (Cardiff Singer of the World, 2005), takes the title role, surrounded by an impressive cast with Mark Elder conducting the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment.The 2CD set, which includes as an Appendix to the recording the aria finale written specifically for Luigia Boccabadati in 1831.

Booklet includes complete libretto with English translation.

'Mark Elder finds just the right balance of beauty and strength' - American Record Guide

Nicole Cabell (Imelda), James Westman (Bonifacio), Massimo Giordano (Lamberto), Frank Lopardo (Orlando), Brindley Sherratt (Ubaldo), Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Mark Elder – conductor

ACT ONE

SCENE ONE.  In one of the principal piazzas of Ghibelline Bologna, outside the house of the Lambertazzi family, a herald posts a notice proclaiming that the truce between the Ghibellines and the Guelphs has expired, and calling upon all  Ghibellines to take up their arms once more.  The populace, exhausted by civil discord, calls on Orlando, the praetor of the city, to secure peace at any cost, but Lamberto, his son, appears with a contingent of men he has just raised, and succeeds in rallying support for renewing the campaign.

SCENE TWO.  An apartment in the palazzo of the Lambertazzi.  Imelda, Orlando’s daughter, deplores her brother Lamberto’s implacable ferocity, for she is secretly in love with Bonifacio Gieremei, the outlawed leader of the Guelphs. 

Ubaldo, a family henchmen, introduces a soldier from the Guelph camp who has come bearing a letter for Orlando.  While Ubaldo goes to deliver the letter, the soldier, left alone with Imelda, raises his visor and reveals himself as Bonifacio. He urges her to fly with him, but she, aware of her duty to her father and family, refuses to follow what she considers such a dishonourable course.  She retires as Ubaldo returns with Orlando, the latter agreeing to suspend hostilities and receive an ambassador from the Guelphs, but only if Gieremei acknowledges his responsibility for past atrocities.  Bonifacio manages to contain himself, and, still playing the part of a common soldier, departs, ostensibly to carry this message to his superiors. 

If Orlando is willing to entertain some hope that negotiations may yet lead to peace, Lamberto is determined to thwart any parley and so precipitate further hostilities.

SCENE THREE.  In an atrium in the Lambertazzi palazzo, Orlando, Lamberto and their Ghibelline followers receive the Guelph ambassador, and discover, to their surprise, that it is none other than Gieremei – Bonifacio – himself.  He demands that he and his adherents should be allowed to return to the city, and that he should be reinstated in his privileges.  As a means of securing lasting peace, he proposes a marriage between himself and Imelda, but Lamberto guarantees that the atmosphere becomes increasing tense by voicing all the objections he sees to such a match: Bonifacio’s father, Rolandino, was responsible for the death of Imelda’s mother – he also slew one of her uncles, and clamped Orlando himself in chains.  Insults on either side are briefly interrupted when Imelda appears, deploring the continuing discord and acting as spokeswoman for the grieving citizenry.  Lamberto persists, however,  in representing Bonifacio’s offer of marriage as a vile affront.  His taunts and challenges result in both sides preparing for an immediate renewal of hostilities.

ACT TWO.

SCENE ONE.  An apartment in the house of the Lambertazzi.  Lamberto, suspicious that there is a secret attachment between Bonifacio and Imelda, interrogates the latter, reminding her of past Gieremei crimes and of the oath which she herself took to help avenge her mother’s death.  Her reply – that the oath was cancelled out when Lamberto slew Bonifacio’s younger brother – falls on deaf ears, and Lamberto, determined to throw her off her guard and discover the truth, pretends that he has gone even further, and has just slain Bonifacio himself.  Imelda’s distress proves all too eloquent, and Lamberto, implacable and ruthless, informs her that, though Bonifacio may still be alive, she has just signed his death warrant.

Ubaldo, meanwhile, has brought Orlando a letter which, written by Bonifacio and intended for Imelda, has reached his hands since it was entrusted to a false messenger.  The letter recognises that any marriage is now impossible, but requests a last farewell assignation that evening.  Lamberto insists that Ubaldo deliver it to Imelda, but without giving her any indication that its contents have been discovered.

SCENE TWO.  A wood, where the forces of the exiled Guelphs are encamped.  Bonifacio returns from his mission, sorrowfully reporting its failure.  All his followers express their determination to fight to the death.

SCENE THREE.  A park within the precincts of the Lambertazzi palazzo.  Imelda comes fearfully to keep her tryst with Bonifacio, but is dismayed and appalled when Lamberto appears.  She beseeches him, if he is out for blood, that she alone may die and that Bonifacio may live, but he informs her that, though he has just killed Bonifacio’s father, that is only half the revenge he seeks.  He insists on her receiving Bonifacio, saying that he himself will be present at their meeting, lying concealed in ambush.

Bonifacio duly appears, urging Imelda to fly with him, and telling her that his father is waiting to receive them outside the city gates.  Imelda is forced to inform him that his father has just been killed.  She urges him to flee, but he draws his sword, intent now only on seeking out and slaying Lamberto.

After a few moments Lamberto appears, his dagger dripping with blood.  He declares that he has stabbed Bonifacio, and that his blade had been steeped in poison.  A distraught Imelda races to find her dying lover, while sounds of fighting are heard in the distance.

SCENE FOUR.  Skirmishes are still taking place in the piazza outside the house of the Lambertazzi.  Lamberto drags on a dying Imelda, informing Orlando that she had tried to suck the poison from Bonifacio’s wound.  The attempt had, however, been in vain: Bonifacio is dying, and now Imelda is dying, too, a victim of the same poison.  She pleads with her father for his forgiveness, but, by now as implacable as his son, he savagely thrusts her from him as she expires.

 

 


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