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La Colombe



La Colombe

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Following his award-winning recording of Donizetti’s Les Martyrs, Sir Mark Elder’s second Opera Rara release of 2015 features a rare recording - Gounod’s delightful opera La Colombe ("The... read more

BUY TRACKS
Song title Time Format Price
playstop01 Introduction03:41
playstop02 Sylvie, Sylvie! Venez-la ma mignonne!02:53
playstop03 Voila qui est fait03:51
playstop04 Qu'il garde son argent!05:49
playstop05 Voyons, seigneur, ecoutez un moment la raison00:32
playstop06 Les amoureux03:17
playstop07 Allons retrouver madame la comtesse02:12
playstop08 Je veux interroger ce jeune homme05:59
playstop09 Ah! Les femmes! Les femmes02:51
playstop10 Et ton maitre partage01:05
playstop11 O vision enchanteresse!03:32
playstop12 Bref, cher seigneur, je suis tout a fait ravie01:03
playstop13 O douce joie!03:59
playstop14 Entr'acte02:47
playstop15 Le grand art de cuisine04:02
playstop16 Les fournisseurs refusent01:20
playstop17 Il faut d'abord dresser la table!09:30
playstop18 Me voila retombee dans une etrange reverie!01:24
playstop19 Que de reves charmants emportes sans retour!03:23
playstop20 Je vous cherche depuis une heure01:22
playstop21 Ces attraits que chacun admire02:30
playstop22 La deesse aujourd'hui se nomme Amynte01:05
playstop23 Mais non, quand nous aurons dine03:18
playstop24 Helas, seigneur, pardonnez-moi05:41
playstop25 Apaisez, blanche colombe02:48

Following his award-winning recording of Donizetti’s Les Martyrs, Sir Mark Elder’s second Opera Rara release of 2015 features a rare recording - Gounod’s delightful opera La Colombe ("The Dove”). Sir Mark and the Hallé are joined by a wonderful cast, led by two of the most acclaimed young singers in the world today - Erin Morley and Javier Camarena along with the established French baritone Laurent Naouri and mezzo Michèle Losier. 

Erin Morley (Sylvie), Javier Camarena (Horace), Laurent Naouir (Maître Jean), Michèle Losier (Mazet). The Halle, Sir Mark Elder - conductor
Act I A young Florentine, Horace, has retired to the country having lavished all his wealth on the vain pursuit of the beautiful Countess Sylvie. He is accompanied by his godson Mazet and his dove (the ‘colombe’) which he has named Sylvie. They are living in penury in a run-down cottage. The bird, however, is not allowed to starve, so Mazet gives it his daily feed (no. 1 Couplets) and takes it outside. Maître Jean knocks and is sourly greeted by Mazet. He has come to enquire about a certain dove that Horace is reputed to own. Mazet describes the bird’s uncommon gifts: it is supremely intelligent, never delivering messages to the wrong address, able to arrange the letters of her name in the right order, and so on. Maître Jean explains that his master, Count Lélio from Pavia, is desperate to buy the bird at any price. When Horace appears, Mazet urges Maître Jean to hide while he opens negotiations. Mazet likes the idea of living in comfort but Horace adamantly refuses any suggestion of selling Sylvie (no. 2 Romance and Trio). Horace goes off and calls for Mazet to follow. Reappearing from his hiding-place Maître Jean sings of the absurdities to which love can lead (no. 3 Couplets). As he is leaving he reveals that he was really sent by the Countess Sylvie, who then appears in person and asks how his offer was received. Firmly refused! But Horace’s tender feelings for the dove, in the view of Maître Jean, suggest that he is still in love with the real Sylvie. Sylvie explains that her rival, Aminte, is the darling of all Florence because she has a parrot that talks and sings. Only by recovering her dove can Sylvie hope to win back her respected place in Florentine society. Maître Jean leaves. Sylvie’s Air (no. 4) affirms her faith in the power of her beauty. Mazet enters and believing Sylvie to be an unknown woman who has strayed into the cottage, lets loose a tirade against all women (no. 5 Couplets). Horace, Mazet tells her, is particularly bitter about the Countess Sylvie and would vent his rage on her if he ever saw her. Sylvie explains to an embarrassed Mazet that she is Sylvie herself. Horace then appears and on seeing Sylvie is enchanted with delight (to Sylvie’s astonishment). In the Terzetto (no. 6) she realizes that Horace is still in her power. She invites herself to dinner. Maître Jean appears, and without explaining that he was sent by her, Sylvie reveals that he is a master chef who will solve the problem of dinner. The Finale – Quartet (no. 7) closes the Act. ACT II After an Entr’acte, the second act opens on the same scene, later in the day. Maître Jean is ready to cook the meal, but there is no food to cook. He sings in praise of the noble art of cooking (no. 8 Air). Mazet reveals that he has only beans to offer. Maître Jean goes off in despair. Horace comes in determined to find a solution to the slender provision of tableware and the absence of food (no. 9 Duo). Mazet finds a few grapes, then Horace goes off and returns with a bird for the oven. It is the dove Sylvie who is called upon to die for the sake of Horace’s love. Mazet goes off to slaughter the bird and Horace goes in search of wine. Sylvie enters, full of regret that she has treated Horace so poorly (no. 10 Romance). Maître Jean agrees to a dinner of beans since Sylvie reminds him that she may yet recover the dove. Horace has found some wine. When she tells him she has not received a single compliment since he left Florence, he sings a Madrigal (no. 11) in praise of her beauty. She tells him about Aminte and her clever parrot. A Quartettino (no. 12) gives everyone a chance to worry about their respective problems. Then Horace and Sylvie sit down to dinner (Duo no. 13) during which Sylvie finally explains to Horace that she would like the dove for herself. The bird is dead, explains a horrified Horace, and we have dined on her. Sylvie responds not with shock but with admiration that Horace could make such a sacrifice out of love for her. The happy ending (no. 14 Finale) is made happier for all when Mazet comes in with the dove Sylvie. It was not dove that they ate, he explains, it was parrot; and not just any parrot, it was Aminte’s parrot.